Easy Road Bike Routes

Easy Rides – know your cycling level

See also: Moderate, Challenging & Tough.

These easy routes are suitable for those who want a lovely day out, enjoying the beautiful scenery in this lovely, quiet part of the Lake District. Enjoy riding on peaceful country lanes, taking in the history of the area, listening to the birdsong, admiring the livestock and taking in fresh country air. There will be plenty of time to take lots of photos, maybe enjoy a picnic and have a dip in the lake or stop at one of the many recommended ‘coffee and cake’ stops. This is an ideal opportunity to ride with family and friends and maybe experience E-bikes for the first time. E-bikes let you effortlessly enjoy the freedom of the outdoors allowing you to ride further than you thought possible. No special cycling clothing required as all the bikes have comfy saddles.

Suitable bikes: Hybrid Leisure Bikes, Road Bikes, Ladies Road Bikes, Children’s Bikes, Mountain Bikes, Hybrid E-Bikes, Road E-Bikes, Mountain E-Bikes.

Coniston Loop Easy Guided Cycle Ride

Coniston Water Loop

A beautiful gently undulating route taking in the quiet east shore of Coniston Water with fantastic views across the lake to the Old Man of Coniston and the mountains beyond. Ideal for families! Approximate distance from 15 to 24 miles.

This ride is our most popular and follows quiet country lanes, meandering close to the lakeshore. Take time to enjoy the lovely countryside, fields of livestock, birdsong and look out for numerous birds of prey.  Lots to keep children occupied, maybe stop off for a swim or a paddle on one of the many coves along the way. The café at Brantwood with it’s lovely high terrace overlooking the lake is a great place to stop for lunch. You may spot the Victorian Steam Gondola as it pulls into the jetty at Brantwood, John Ruskin’s former home.

If you are full of coffee and cake you can have a leisurely return to Lowick by the same route, stopping by the lake to take lots of memorable photos. Or continue on to visit Coniston village at the foot of the mountain with it’s shops, pubs and café. For the more adventurous, head for Tarn Hows, only four miles further on.

Ulverston Low Furness Loop

High Furness Loop

Panoramic views over Morecambe Bay, visiting the ancient market town of Ulverston, riding through wonderful rural landscapes. Approximate distance 15-19 miles.

This area now in Cumbria, used to be part of Lancashire and was split into High and Low Furness, ancient palatines. This route meanders south from Lowick through rich undulating agricultural land towards Ulverston. Enjoy the beautiful countryside before arriving in Ulverston, a small historic market town where there are plenty of opportunities to eat, drink and shop. There is an option to visit the Manjushri Centre on the coastal road just out of Ulverston. With its magnificent Buddhist Temple, lovely tranquil grounds with beach walks and a welcome vegetarian café serving delicious cakes, it is worth spending some time here. Free to enter. The journey back to Lowick passes by the country’s shortest canal and has wide open views of Morecambe Bay looking over towards the Yorkshire peaks in the far distance. There are more magnificent views looking towards the Old Man of Coniston on the final stretch back along quiet country lanes.

High and Low Furness Loop easy ride

High & Low Furness Loop

A lovely route which takes in the ancient Furness Abbey and explores the many pretty villages of Low Furness. Approximate distance 30 miles.

The route first follows the High Furness Loop above to the Manjushri Centre and then is extended to continue further along this flattish section of coastal road. The route leads to the Bosun’s locker, a café at Roa Island overlooking Piel Island with its castle, where homemade refreshments can be had. It continues its journey past the ancient ruins of Furness Abbey and then returns on scenic country lanes through the many villages in this rural area. The café at Gleaston Watermill is well worth a visit with outdoor seating situated next to Gleaston Castle, or why not stop off at ‘Cumbria Cow’ a lovely ice cream Farm before the delightful journey back from Ulverston to Lowick, with its magnificent views.

Rusland Valley Loop

A delightful route in the quiet Rusland Valley, an area of gently rolling hills, woodland and traditional farmland. Approximate distance 18 miles.

The route from Lowick goes through the hamlet of Oxen Park and has a few short hills before arriving at Force Forge, where the power of the beck originally provided the power for the iron smelt works in the 17th and early 18th century. It continues on to the Rusland Valley – this is rural south Cumbria at it’s quietest and most quaint, well known for its ancient mixed forests of oak, hazel and birch. Birch was once grown specifically to provide timber for local iron foundries and for bobbins used in the cotton industry. The writer Arthur Ransome loved it here and is buried with his wife under a Corsican pine at Rusland Church. On the way back to Lowick, the route goes through Bouth and an opportunity to have something to eat at the White Hart, a rural traditional pub or visit the Ice Cream Parlour and Historic Working Farm on the edge of the village.

Hawkshead village easy guided ride

Rusland Valley Loop & Hawkshead

A beautiful route along the quiet rural lanes of the Southern Lake District with superb scenery. Approximate distance: 28 miles.

A small hill from Spark Bridge is a warm-up before descending into Bouth and the flat valley bottom of the tidal Rusland Pool. The river valley is followed to Rusland and onwards to the ‘Lost Valley’, so named as it has remained unaltered for the last 200 years. The hamlet of Dale Park is tucked away among the ancient mixed deciduous forest of oak, hazel and other native tree species. These were used in past times for coppicing, charcoal burning and eventually bobbin making. 

Make the most of this rural tranquility before joining the road to Hawkshead, a large village loved by tourists. Stop for lunch in one of the many cafés or pubs and watch the world go by or even do a bit of shopping? The route leaves Hawkshead heading to High Wray where you can enjoy a quick, free pop into the grounds of Wray Castle, situated on the shore of Windermere. A short windy road eventually leads to the Drunken Duck pub, worth a stop here to admire the view north over Lake Windermere, Ambleside and the Lakeland mountains. Heading now towards Coniston and up to the top of Hawkshead Hill, it is downhill from here and then along the east shore of Coniston Water. The café at Brantwood is the place to stop for afternoon tea as you marvel at the views from the elevated terrace overlooking Coniston Water with the Lakeland mountains in the backdrop.

Just 6 miles back to Lowick and the end of a perfect day in the wonderful fresh air!

Cartmel Peninsula

This delightful route follows pretty lanes and quiet roads through beautiful countryside to the pretty village of Cartmel. Approximate distance 20 miles.

This varied route crosses the estuary at Greenodd, before following the old railway line which once linked Lakeside to Ulverston. This is part of the Morecambe Bay cycle route and it leads to Roudsea Nature Reserve and then alongside the tidal river Leven to Clock Tower, originally an important gunpowder factory. The route leads past Holker Hall, a country house set in 200 acres of gardens and lovely parkland, which is worth cycling through to visit the courtyard café for lunch or refreshments. The very old village of Cartmel with it’s ancient Priory dating back to the 11th century is a short distance from here. Lots to see here and explore this quaint village with individual shops and a good choice of places to eat. The route returns to Lowick along quiet rural lanes in lush countryside with the opportunity to stop off for a well deserved ice-cream at Old Hall Farm Vintage Ice cream Parlour and Heritage Working Farm in Bouth.

This ride can be extended to take in the Victorian seaside town of Grange-over-Sands or the beautiful Lyth Valley renowned for its damsons, and spectacular blossom in the Spring.